Notes on a Theory…

Thoughts on politics, law, & social science

Posts Tagged ‘conservatism

The GOP voted to kill people because they favor people dying

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The recent vote by the Republicans in the House repealing the ACA is part of a pattern.

The right has opposed expanding health insurance since forever. They opposed Truman’s proposal for national health insurance. They opposed Medicare and Medicaid. Ronald Reagan insisted that adopting Medicare would be the end of freedom in America, which helped cement his position as a rising conservative star. They opposed national health insurance (proposed by Ted Kennedy) and a more limited health insurance reform proposal from Jimmy Carter.  They opposed Bill Clinton’s efforts to expand access to health care. They opposed the ACA. They fought against the Medicaid expansion.

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Written by David Kaib

May 5, 2017 at 9:58 pm

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Searching for Political Morality in All the Wrong Places

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Guest post by Jonathan Cohn

Politics and morality are never far apart. As such, one key difference between liberals and conservatives is how they derive morality. And both derivations are flawed.

For the liberal, morality is a derivative of intellect, understood in terms of smartness (the assimilation and application of facts) and sophistication. For the liberal, then, immorality is a result of a lack of education. Racism, xenophobia, sexism, etc.—often treated more as individual failings than systemic injustices—can be cured through better education. (The problem, of course, is that the social structures that perpetuate these forms of prejudice and enact them in policy are usually quite well-educated, but also quite immoral.)

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Written by David Kaib

March 28, 2016 at 8:05 am

This One Chart Shows Everything That’s Wrong With Liberal Politics

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All right, not just a chart, but the chart and accompanying post. And not everything, but something important.

The other Jonathan Cohn had a post from shortly before the election at the New Republic that highlights a chart from the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute regarding the state’s decision not to expand Medicaid as part of the ACA.

It’s easy to recognize the human toll of refusing to expand Medicaid. It’s not so easy to recognize the economic toll. Maybe this chart will help:

GA-Medicaid-dollars-624x589

[snip]

But the state officials who have blocked expansion aren’t simply depriving some people of health insurance. They are depriving the entire state of federal funds. Under the Affordable Care Act, the federal government picks up 100 percent of the expansion cost for the first three years, then scales back its support to 90 percent. At that point, states will have to find the money to cover that remaining 10 percent. It’s real money. But it’s tiny compared to what they get in return. The federal money is a huge influx of cash, which goes first to providers and suppliers of health care. That money, in turn, generates additional economic activity.

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Written by David Kaib

November 10, 2014 at 10:58 pm

How the NRA Shifted the Debate: Or One Way Conservatives are Better at Politics

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I’ve harped here on the notion, both popular and academic, that ‘talk’ doesn’t matter – that decisions are the key unit of politics, they are action, driven by some set of fundamental forces, unaffected by interactions among people. This is connected to an idea I’ve called democratic efficiency: that public opinion translates automatically into public policy, like a political market (market here being the imagined one of economic theory rather than anything that exists in the real world). This position renders the vast bulk of political activity nonsensical, but it has the handy consequence of ensuring that any outcome is explainable–some set of actors or policies won out because they were favored (probably by the voters), the proof being that said actors or policies won out. It’s circular, of course, yet somehow deeply satisfying.

I was thinking about this while observing the response to the horrific shooting in Newtown.  Many liberals took the shooting as license to demand gun control, something that has been verboten for quite some time. (There has also been a good deal of discussion of mental health, which on its own is a good thing but somewhat troubling as an anti-violence strategy, but let’s leave that aside).  At the same time, numerous conservatives announced their own support for things like arming teachers.

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Written by David Kaib

December 21, 2012 at 5:33 pm

Do Not Concentrate on the Finger…Or You Will Miss All that Heavenly Glory

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Corey Robin throw a little cold water on the death of conservatism thesis making the rounds in light of last night’s (fairly close) election.

[L]ast night Barack Obama claimed that reducing the debt and the deficit—elsewhere they call that austerity—will be a top priority of his second administration. There’s a history to this, as I’ve pointed out. But it also confirms another thing I said in the conclusion to The Reactionary Mind: Conservatism is dead because it lives. It has triumphed. It may lose elections, but its basic assumptions, going back to the reaction against the New Deal, now govern both parties. The economist John Quiggin calls it Zombie Economics, and it has never seemed a more appropriate metaphor. The dead walk among us. They are us.

As they say, read the whole thing.

Our political discourse encourages us to pay attention to formal decisions and ignore that which is taken for granted.  It tells us to look at those thing that are contested and to ignore those that are not.  Political science does as well.  Without suggesting that these things don’t matter, it’s important to look beyond them too.  That may be difficult today, but it’s absolutely essential tomorrow.

Written by David Kaib

November 7, 2012 at 11:19 pm

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